Frontpage Slideshow

DUBAI, UAE (PAMACC News) - Climate finance supports various climate change mitigation and adaptation activities, as well as efforts to enable the transition towards low-carbon, climate-resilient development environment stakeholders have stated at COP28 in Dubai. The Pan African Climate Justice Alliance, PACJA who joined other stakeholders to clamour for the doubling of adaptation finance by industrialized countries also hammered on the need for private sector finance as catalyst for green growth in Africa. “Mobilizing private sector financing for climate and green growth in Africa imperative. The should be crucial collaboration between banks and civil society to drive this agenda,” Mithika Mwenda, PACJA CEO said at side event relating to finance mobilization. He notes that the continent holds immense potential for sustainable development, calling on the need for stakeholders to work together to better achieve positive results Mithika also explored the pivotal role of civil society in driving meaningful change and stressing the importance of a united front for effective climate action. Despite its growing political commitment toward green growth and its rich natural capital endowment, the continent lags behind other regions on many green growth dimensions, in particular on the provision of green economic opportunities, participants at the side event said. Progress on efficient and sustainable resource use and on the promotion of social inclusion has not been sufficient to catch up with other world regions, it was noted. Thus the need to mobilize funds the meet these voids, it was resolved. According to a document by the African Development Bank, Africa will require about $1.3 trillion annually to meet its sustainable development needs by 203 and thus to achieve green growth. “Most of this finance is expected to be met through private finance. To meet these needs and given the current levels of public climate finance, private climate finance should increase by about 36 percent each year until 2030,” the document stated. Leaders attending this year’s global climate change conference in Dubai urged a more global response to the continent’s adaptation financing needs to tackle the impact of climate change and build resilience. Speaking during the Adaptation Finance Summit for Africa on the second day of the COP28, African leaders said climate adaptation funding, currently at 39% of all climate finance flows to Africa, must rapidly increase. “ The climate adaptation funding for Africa is quite insufficient. It’s the responsibility of funding institutions and governments to provide the needed funds,” Kenyan President William Ruto said. ‘’The Nairobi Declaration adopted by the African leaders in September reimagines Africa’s future as a thriving, resilient continent that embraces Climate-Positive Growth. The essence and ambition of APRA are encapsulated in this. We need a holistic approach that delivers on both climate and development priorities, tailored to our needs and communities. We need plans that account for all elements: starting with infrastructure, through policy and regulation to institutional and human capacity,” he declared. The high-level session also included Comoros President and African Union Chairman Azali Assoumani, Tanzanian President Samia Suluhu Hassan, Senegalese President Macky…
Climate and health: building consensus on a unified approach for post COP28 ACTION By Friday Phiri DUBAI, UAE (PAMACC News) - It is often said that environment and health are two sides of the same coin. The interdependence between environment and health cannot be ignored anymore as scientific evidence keeps highlighting that a poorly managed environment is a recipe for an increased disease burden across the globe. For instance, it is a no brainer that poor sanitation is a leading cause of water borne-related diseases, just as the case is with increased antimicrobial resistance and cancers resulting from poor chemical and other hazardous waste management. In recognition of the interplay between health and the environment, environmental and health experts have been working collaboratively to promote the one health concept—an integrated and unifying approach that aims to sustainably balance and optimize the health of people, animals and ecosystems. One health recognises that the health of humans, domestic and wild animals, plants, and the wider environment (including ecosystems) are closely linked and interdependent. While health, food, water, energy and environment are all wider topics with sector-specific concerns, the collaboration across sectors and disciplines contributes to protect health, address health challenges such as the emergence of infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, and food safety and promote the health and integrity of ecosystems. By linking humans, animals and the environment, One Health can help to address the full spectrum of disease control; from prevention to detection, preparedness, response and management – and contribute to global health security. The approach can be applied at the community, sub-national, national, regional and global levels, and relies on shared and effective governance, communication, collaboration and coordination. Having the One Health approach in place makes it easier for people to better understand the co-benefits, risks, trade-offs and opportunities to advance equitable and holistic solutions. As a consequence of poor environmental management, climate change has emerged as a major threat to global health,with the most vulnerable populations facing the greatest impact. Unfortunately, those who contribute least to the problem often suffer the most severe consequences. It is estimated that around 824 million people globally are malnourished, of which 58.7 million children are in Africa. Additionally, millions in Africa lack basic water and sanitation, leading to significant child mortality from diarrhoea.It is further estimated that58% ofinfectiousdiseasesgloballyhavebeenintensifiedbychanges in climate.This has ripple effects on public health, economy, environment, and education. The situation is predicted to worsen with rising global temperatures, threateningprogresstowardstheSustainableDevelopmentGoals (SDGs) and Universal Health Coverage. TheIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment report warns that climate change affects, both physical and mental health, and can exacerbate humanitarian crises, and recognises the need for action.Paragraph C.2 of the aforesaid report, states: “Deep, rapid and sustained mitigation and acceleratedimplementation of adaptation actions in this decade would reduce projected losses and damages forhumans and ecosystems, and deliver many co-benefits, especially for air quality and health.” Thus, several efforts are underway to integrate health into the formal UNFCCC discourse and to gain political traction on the…
DUBAI, UAE (PAMACC News) - As COP 28 begins in Dubai, the Pan African Climate Justice Alliance, PACJA is seeking for transparent and just measures to address climate change challenges. At a press conference organized by civil society actors various speakersraised concerns on the credibility and trustworthiness of the different actors on the negotiation table. “We need to amplify the voices of the vulnerable communities in this climate change talks, that of inclusiveness, transparency and justice . The developed countries and their leaders have to show real commitment and honour their pledges,” Dr Mithika Mwenda, PACJA CEO said at the press briefing. The African Civil Society emphasizes the importance of fairness, openness, and impartiality. They firmly urge all stakeholders to adhere to these principles to ensure that the decisions made during COP28 UAE align with the global commitment to combat climate change. “We need a leadership that reflects these values and upholds the promise of a collective effort in addressing environmental challenges. The interest of the vulnerable communities, women, youths, indigenous population have to be protected” notes Dr Augustine Njamnshi of PACJA and CEO ACSEA. Meanwhile at side event by PACJA prior to the official opening of COP 28, civil society actors in a panel discussion called for greater and sustainable production of a variety of minerals that are central to de-carbonization in Africa. “We have clear opportunities not only from the global green mineral boom but also from our domestic achievements, such as the African Continental Free-Trade Area to facilitate the development of regional value chains for our green economy products in Africa," says Dr Linus Mofor, Senior Environmental Affairs Officer African Climate Policy Centre, ACPC at the panel discussion Africa experts say is home to multiple minerals. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), for example, produces over 70% of the world’s cobalt. DRC and Zambia together supply 10% of global copper while Mozambique and South Africa hold significant reserves of graphite, platinum metals, lithium and more. Linus Mofor deplored the fact that about 70% of the Africa’s exports are unprocessed commodities, a situation that can change with the right policies that prioritise industrialization and value-addition in mining and other resource sectors. GOOD NEWS AT OFFICIAL OPENING However there was some good news at the official opening of COP 28. The President of COP 28, announced loss and damage fund forvulnerable countries on the first day of the UN climate conference with a total commitment of over $420 million. The UAE host country and Germany took the lead contributing $100 million each to the fund. “We’ve delivered history today. The first time a decision has been adopted on day 1 of any COP. And the speed at which we have done so is also historic. Getting this done demonstrates the hard work of so many, particularly members of the transitional committee who worked tirelessly to get us to this point. This is evidence that we can deliver. COP28 can deliver,” said Dr Sultan Al Jaber, president, COP28. He said…
DUBAI, UAE (PAMACC News – The United Nations Climate Change Conference COP28 will open tomorrow with a resounding call to accelerate collective climate action. The conference takes place in what is already known to be the hottest year ever recorded in human history and as the impacts of the climate crisis wreak unprecedented havoc on human life and livelihoods around the world. COP28 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE), from 30 November to 12 December 2023, is a decisive moment to act on climate commitments and prevent the worst impacts of climate change. UAE has the presidency for COP28, with Dr Sultan Al Jaber as this year’s president. This year’s COP marks the conclusion of the “global stocktake”, the first assessment of global progress in implementing the 2015 Paris Agreement. The findings are stark: the world is not on track to limiting temperature rise to 1.5°C by the end of this century. It does recognize that countries are developing plans for a net-zero future, and the shift to clean energy is gathering speed, but it makes clear that the transition is nowhere near fast enough yet to limit warming within the current ambitions. A report recently published by UN Climate Change shows that national climate action plans (known as nationally determined contributions, or ‘NDCs’) would collectively lower greenhouse gas emissions to 2% below 2019 levels by 2030, while the science is clear that a 43% reduction is needed. The global stocktake must be a catalyst for greater ambition in meeting the Paris Agreement’s goals as nations prepare to submit revised national climate action plans by 2025. It lays out actions on how to accelerate emissions cuts, strengthen resilience to climate impacts, and provide the support and finance needed for the transformation. “Over 160 world leaders are headed to Dubai, because only cooperation between nations can get humanity back in this race. But COP28 cannot be just a photo-op. Leaders must deliver – the message is clear,” said UN Climate Change Executive Secretary Simon Stiell. “And as leaders leave Dubai after the opening summit, their message to their negotiators must be equally clear: don’t come home without a deal that will make a real difference.” Climate finance stands at the heart of this transformation. Replenishing the Green Climate Fund, doubling financial resources for adaptation and operationalizing the loss and damage fund are key to keeping 1.5°C within reach while leaving no one behind. “The reality is that without much more finance flowing to developing countries, a renewables revolution will remain a mirage in the desert. COP28 must turn it into a reality,” Stiell added. Progress on climate finance at COP28 will be crucial to build trust in other negotiation areas and to lay the groundwork for an even more ambitious “New Collective Quantified Goal” for climate finance, which must be in place next year. It will also set the stage for a just and inclusive transition to renewable energy and the phasing out of fossil fuels. In the face of rising…
Page 4 of 153
--------- --------- --------- ---------
Top
We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…